show episodes
 
The most entertaining and enraging stories from mythology told casually, contemporarily, and (let's be honest) sarcastically. Greek and Roman gods did some pretty weird (and awful) things. Liv focuses on Greek and Roman mythology's (mis)treatment of women, the wild things the gods did, and the all around incredible minds of the ancient world. I mean, how did they come up with this stuff? Gods, goddesses, heroes, monsters, and everything in between. Regular episodes every Tuesday, conversatio ...
 
Thought-provoking videos about life and being human, with ideas from business leaders, psychologists and researchers speaking onstage at the TED conference, TEDx events and partner events around the world. You can also download these and many other videos free on TED.com, with an interactive English transcript and subtitles in up to 80 languages. TED is a nonprofit devoted to Ideas Worth Spreading.
 
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show series
 
This is a bonus episode from our Patreon at the $2 level. Deep in the storied past of Iceland, the Yule Cat once roamed the snowy forests, valleys and villages—stalking and devouring any who weren’t given new clothes for the holiday. Pour yourself a holiday-themed beverage and get ready for a feline-centric midwinter myth that will get you in the m…
 
Helen is simultaneously the most well known mortal of myth and a complete and utter enigma. What do we actually know about her, and the choices she did and did not make that lead to the Trojan War? CW/TW: far too many Greek myths involve assault. Given it's fiction, and typically involves gods and/or monsters, I'm not as deferential as I would be w…
 
Liv speaks with teacher, songwriter, and ancient instrument musician Bettina Joy De Guzman all about ancient instruments, music, and singing songs of Greek myths and stories. Find more about Bettina Joy's work here: bettinajoydeguzman.com CW/TW: far too many Greek myths involve assault. Given it's fiction, and typically involves gods and/or monster…
 
How did sex workers in ancient Greece and Rome manage their periods? What were the most popular fashions for pubic hair? What underwear was everyone wearing? And how did sex workers handle contraception and unwanted pregnancies? In this episode, we team up with Kate the Exploress to delve into the most intimate aspects of daily life for sex workers…
 
Oh, far-shooting Apollo... What are you exclusively the god of, anyway? All things Apollo, the good and the very, very bad. Submit your questions to Liv's 2022 New Year Q&A episode here. CW/TW: far too many Greek myths involve assault. Given it's fiction, and typically involves gods and/or monsters, I'm not as deferential as I would be were I refer…
 
We’re dropping this bonus episode to let you know we’re going to be doing something a little different in December. In addition to dropping our normal scheduled episodes once a week on Thursday, we’re going to be dropping a second episode on Mondays from our bank of extra Patreon episodes at the $2 level. It's a way to boost traffic for the holiday…
 
Homeric Hymns are beautiful and detailed and so, so ancient... The two Homeric Hymns to Apollo tell the story of his birth and the founding of the Oracle at Delphi. This is not a standard narrative story episode, it's simply a bonus reading of an epic. For regular episodes look for any that don't have "Liv Reads..." in the title! Attributions and l…
 
Despite inspiring desire of all kinds in people of all genders, Aphrodite herself is often depicted as a cisgender woman. But not always. Ancient writers tell us of mystery cults that worshipped Aphrodite as a transgender woman--or perhaps as nonbinary or intersex. And when you delve into her most ancient roots, there’s an even older tradition of w…
 
Prometheus tells Io of her ongoing story of suffering, but also hey! She's going to start quite the dynasty. Finally, Hermes arrives with news from Zeus. CW/TW: far too many Greek myths involve assault. Given it's fiction, and typically involves gods and/or monsters, I'm not as deferential as I would be were I referencing the real thing. Sources: T…
 
There's so, so much more to the concept of "Homer" than a blind poet from Archaic Greece. In fact, there probably was never any Homer, or any Hesiod for that matter. Plus... Toxic heroes being toxic. Follow the Sententiae Antiquae twitter here, or visit the site for loads of ancient Greek and Roman goodness: here. Attributions and licensing informa…
 
Goddess of sex workers, Our Lady of the Castration Foam, the walking embodiment of orgasm herself—Aphrodite was one of the most powerful goddesses in the Olympian pantheon. And as a free, unattached woman with lots of sexual agency, she directly threatened the patriarchy. In this episode, we’ll examine the stories told about Aphrodite--and what the…
 
Prometheus laments and laments, he meets the Titan Oceanus and, finally, the woman and survivor of Zeus, Io. The Prometheus Bound is an examination of tyranny and the rule of Zeus, king of the gods. CW/TW: far too many Greek myths involve assault. Given it's fiction, and typically involves gods and/or monsters, I'm not as deferential as I would be …
 
Turns out the Classical world is ripe for use in memes! Liv speaks with Ben of the Classical Studies Memes for Hellenistic Teens Twitter and Facebook empires about Classics, memes, and a whole lot else. Attributions and licensing information for music used in the podcast can be found here: mythsbaby.com/sources-attributions. See acast.com/privacy f…
 
If you know anything about Aphrodite, then you know she is the ancient Greek goddess primarily associated with love, beauty, sex, reproduction, and passion. She was also the patron goddess of sex workers in the ancient Classical world. Join us as we explore how Aphrodite was worshipped in ancient Greece, the goddess's history and ancient roots, and…
 
Prometheus gave humanity fire, but he paid the price. Prometheus is brought to his punishment and meets the chorus of Oceanids. The Prometheus Bound is an examination of tyranny and the rule of Zeus, king of the gods. CW/TW: far too many Greek myths involve assault. Given it's fiction, and typically involves gods and/or monsters, I'm not as deferen…
 
In the first readings of Ovid, Liv reads the letters of Hypsipyle and Medea. Hypsipyle writes to Jason after hearing he's not coming back to Lemnos, she's heard of his new wife Medea and wants to tell him about the twins she gave birth to. Medea writes to Jason to remind him everything she did for him before he gave her up for a Greek princess. Thi…
 
Liv Albert from Let's Talk About Myths Baby! has an obsession, and the name of that obsession is Assassin's Creed Odyssey. This game immerses you immediately in Ancient Greece--and provides loads of historically accurate settings from the world we've been exploring this season: the symposia of Athens, the pleasures of Corinth, the Peloponnesian War…
 
Hades and Persephone are some of the most beloved characters of Greek myth and Rachel Smythe is retelling their story (and so many others) in the incredible Webtoon (and now, book!) Lore Olympus. Rachel and Liv chat mythology and adapting myth, characters and sourcing, and so much more. CW/TW: far too many Greek myths involve assault. Given it's fi…
 
Liv speaks with Maxwell T Paule all about witches (and much, much more) of classical myth and Roman poetry... Follow Maxwell on Twitter and TikTok. The poem recited is Horace's Epode 5, translated by Maxwell T Paule. CW/TW: far too many Greek myths involve assault. Given it's fiction, and typically involves gods and/or monsters, I'm not as deferent…
 
The werewolf myth as we know it today generally involves getting bitten by a werewolf, transforming during the full moon, and being very susceptible to silver bullets. But werewolves in ancient Greece and Rome were a little different. Join us for a spooky-season deep dive into ancient werewolf mythology from thousands of years ago. We'll take a loo…
 
Oh, cursed, cursed Cassandra. The princess of Troy is an enigma whose story is told in disjointed fragments that this episode weaves together. CW/TW: far too many Greek myths involve assault. Given it's fiction, and typically involves gods and/or monsters, I'm not as deferential as I would be were I referencing the real thing. Sources: Theoi.com: A…
 
In a series of trailers, LTAMB is highlighting other shows from small, independent people that are doing good things and that you might be interested in. This is a trailer for the podcast The Partial Historians! You can find The Partial Historians on Apple and Spotify or wherever you get your podcasts. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out …
 
Some things are eternal. What does Persephone have in common with Sidney Prescott? Or Antigone with Marion Crane? Let Vanessa tell you all about it... Find more about Vanessa's study of horror in myth and Greek tragedy here, and follow her on Twitter for more. CW/TW: far too many Greek myths involve assault. Given it's fiction, and typically involv…
 
What tales kept people from thousands of years ago up at night? This Halloween, Ancient History Fangirl teams up with Liv Albert from Let’s Talk About Myths, Baby! to delve into spooky stories from the ancient world that will send a shiver up your spine—tales of shrieking Banshees, deathly Furies, and the terrors of Samhain. So spread some salt ove…
 
So. Many. Snakes. To continue Spooky Season, a look at the Father of Monsters, Typhoeus (or Typhon), and the near equally monstrous Echidna. CW/TW: far too many Greek myths involve assault. Given it's fiction, and typically involves gods and/or monsters, I'm not as deferential as I would be were I referencing the real thing. Sources: Theoi.com; Ear…
 
A Spooky Season re-airing of Liv reading Book XI of Homer’s Odyssey, translated into prose by Samuel Butler. Odysseus visits the edge of the Underworld and calls upon the dead... This is not a standard narrative story episode, it's simply a bonus reading of Homer. For regular episodes look for any that don't have "Liv Reads..." in the title! For a …
 
Dads who devour their children. Disembodied baby heads. Corpses that stand up on the battlefield to prophesy doom. Women who return from the grave to carry on steamy affairs. The Ancient Greeks did ghost stories...a little differently. This week, we team up with Liv Albert from Let’s Talk About Myths, Baby! to bring you three ghostly tales from anc…
 
As a continuation from the reading of Apollonios' Argonautika, revisiting the story of Medea and Jason after the return of the Argonauts and the quest for the Golden Fleece... This is a re-airing of an episode that aired in 2019. Sources: please see the original episode, LXVII (67) for the sources used. Attributions and licensing information for mu…
 
Doubling human life expectancy in a century is our greatest achievement, says author Steven Johnson. How did we make it happen -- and can we keep it going? Backed by fascinating historical anecdotes, he shares some life-lengthening innovations and reminds us of three key things needed to make sure all of humanity enjoys these advancements in health…
 
A re-airing of two past Spooky Season episodes... All about witches of Greek myth, and werewolves and ghosts! Sources: please see the original episodes, XCIV (94), and the Spooky Halloween Special from 2019, for the sources used. Attributions and licensing information for music used in the podcast can be found here: mythsbaby.com/sources-attributio…
 
Communities all over the ancient world had a problem: their dead wouldn't stay in the ground. They rose up as shambolic corpses, gusts of wind and evil spirits, draining human life force and devouring flesh and blood. The vampire myth is an ancient one, found on every continent. Join us as we explore the oldest vampire myths we could find from Sume…
 
As a continuation from the reading of Apollonios' Argonautika, revisiting the story of Medea and Jason after the return of the Argonauts and the quest for the Golden Fleece... This is a re-airing of an episode that aired in 2019. Sources: please see the original episode, LXVI (66) for the sources used. Attributions and licensing information for mus…
 
A re-airing of Liv's favourite Spooky Season story... Erysichthon, the man who ate himself, and boogeywomen of ancient Greece. Sources: please see the original episode, XCV (95), for the sources used. Attributions and licensing information for music used in the podcast can be found here: mythsbaby.com/sources-attributions. See acast.com/privacy for…
 
The Lupanar, or “Wolf Den,” is the infamous brothel of Pompeii. Elodie Harper’s bestselling novel follows the lives of the sex workers who lived and worked there—their passions, their heartbreaks, and the tightly-knit community they built for themselves. Today, we’ve invited Elodie on the show to talk about the realities of sex workers’ lives in th…
 
Liv reads Book IV, part 3 of Apollonios' Argonautika, translated by RC Seaton. In the final part of the Argonautika, the Argonauts leave Phaeacia with Jason and Medea married before getting lost in Libya and then finally, finally, reaching the Greek mainland. This is not a standard narrative story episode, it's simply a bonus reading of an epic. Fo…
 
Liv speaks with Amy Pistone Greek Tragedy, specifically: Sophocles and why he's every bit as good as Euripides, maybe... better? The plays referened are Sophocles' The Women of Trachis, Oedipus Tyrannos, Ajax, and Philoctetes and Euripides Medea, Bacchae, and Orestes. CW/TW: far too many Greek myths involve assault. Given it's fiction, and typicall…
 
Last week, we told you about the lives of five courtesans in Classical Athens. But we left someone out--perhaps the most elite hetaera of them all. Long-term partner of a leading Athenian statesman, darling of the philosophical set, survivor of the plague of Athens—she threw her own parties, and they were the best parties ever thrown within a hundr…
 
Liv reads Book IV, part 2 of Apollonios' Argonautika, translated by RC Seaton. Fleeing from Colchis, the Argonauts reach Circe's island before making their way to the Phaeacians. This is not a standard narrative story episode, it's simply a bonus reading of an epic. For regular episodes look for any that don't have "Liv Reads..." in the title! Attr…
 
Liv speaks with Dr. Cora Beth Fraser all about the Minotaur, Asterion, in the Labyrinth in all its forms and how he relates to autistic people and autism! Follow Cora Beth on Twitter here, follow the new resource for neuro-divergency in Classics, Asterion, on Twitter here and check out Asterion's website here. CW/TW: far too many Greek myths involv…
 
In our last few episodes on sex workers in ancient Greece, we tried to paint a picture of a group of women, in some cases, with more freedom and independence than most in the ancient Greek world could dream of. But that freedom came at a price. Now, we’re going to tell you about the lives of some of ancient Greece’s most famous Hetaerae. Get ad-fre…
 
Global obesity rates are on the rise, but body shaming campaigns are doing more harm than good, says medical anthropologist Nancy N. Chen. Reflecting on how the cultural histories of body ideals have changed over time, she offers a new way to view ourselves and our health by enhancing body diversity to close the gap between what's ideal and what's …
 
Liv reads Book IV, part 1 of Apollonios' Argonautika, translated by RC Seaton. Medea flees Colchis with Jason and the Argonauts and they come up with a plan to get away from the Colchian ships, and Medea's brother Apsyrtus, following them. This is not a standard narrative story episode, it's simply a bonus reading of an epic. For regular episodes l…
 
Liv speaks with Danielle LaRose, actor and playwright, about her newest work: The Amazonomachy, a play retelling the myths of the Amazons (plus they talk Amazons generally, along with other fun things!). Learn more about Tiger's Hearts Collective here. For more information about Achilles & Patroclus check out the Seattle Opera. CW/TW: far too many …
 
The symposia--all-male drinking parties--were the playground and hunting ground of Athens' elite courtesans. But they had their dangers, too. Join us as we attend a symposium with the fast set of Ancient Athens. We’re going to hang out with the hetaerae, drink our faces off, flirt outrageously with everyone in range, and debate with the philosopher…
 
Some believe Eurpides' play ends with Iphigenia walking to her sacrifice, but there's an epilogue that may or may not have been written by the tragedian. CW/TW: far too many Greek myths involve assault. Given it's fiction, and typically involves gods and/or monsters, I'm not as deferential as I would be were I referencing the real thing. Sources: I…
 
The Greeks weren't able to sail for Troy but for the sacrifice of Agamemnon's eldest daughter, Iphigenia. Part three of Euripides's tragedy retelling Iphigenia's fate. CW/TW: far too many Greek myths involve assault. Given it's fiction, and typically involves gods and/or monsters, I'm not as deferential as I would be were I referencing the real thi…
 
Liv speaks with Joe Goodkin, the modern Homeric Bard, about his work's Joe's Odyssey and the Blues of Achilles. They chat Homeric epics and the field of Classics. Follow Joe on Twitter here, and visit the websites mentioned: Joe's Odyssey, the Blues of Achilles, and JoeGoodkin.com. CW/TW: far too many Greek myths involve assault. Given it's fiction…
 
The conventional wisdom is that sex workers in ancient Greece were divided into two main categories: pornai who were enslaved in brothels, and hetaerae, who were elite courtesans. That’s actually a drastic oversimplification. This is the beginning of a journey into the world of sex workers in ancient Greece. Join us as we explore what life was like…
 
Dating back more than 800 years, chocolate is deeply woven into the Indigenous history of Oaxaca, Mexico. TED Fellow Germán Santillán talks about his work reviving the Mixtec technique used to prepare this ancient delicacy by training a new generation of local farmers -- helping create economic opportunity and preserve a delicious legacy at the sam…
 
The Greeks weren't able to sail for Troy but for the sacrifice of Agamemnon's eldest daughter, Iphigenia. Part two of Euripides's tragedy retelling Iphigenia's fate. CW/TW: far too many Greek myths involve assault. Given it's fiction, and typically involves gods and/or monsters, I'm not as deferential as I would be were I referencing the real thing…
 
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